We all need more mental health support, and a new poll from the National Alliance on Mental Illness (NAMI) is proof. The report shows an overwhelming number of American workers employed at large organizations believe it’s appropriate to talk about mental health at work and broadly support mental health training in the workplace. The poll, conducted by Ipsos, also finds a knowledge gap in employer-provided mental healthcare coverage, indicating the need for more communication to improve workplace culture.

“This poll shows that, without a doubt, today’s workforce wants their employers to care about their mental health – by talking about it, giving training on it, and providing support for it,” said NAMI CEO Daniel H. Gillison Jr.

A few key takeaways from the report:

  • 74% of full-time employees in the U.S. say it is appropriate to discuss mental health concerns at work, but only 58% say they feel comfortable sharing about their mental health at work.
  • 15% of employees ages 18-29 rated their mental health as “somewhat poor.”
  • Employees who are less comfortable talking about their mental health at work are more likely to report feeling burnout and their mental health suffering because of work.
  • The same is true for managers who feel their workplace isn’t giving them the proper resources to discuss mental health.
  • Employees who are less comfortable talking about their mental health at work are more likely to report feeling burnout and their mental health suffering because of work. The same is true for managers who feel their workplace isn’t giving them the proper resources to discuss mental health.
  • Burnout is a problem, especially among women, young workers and mid-level employees. Proper mental health resources and increased comfort in discussing mental health at work may contribute to lower burnout on the job.
  • A higher share of female employees and employees under age 50 report experiencing feelings of burnout this past year. 54% of mid-level employees say the same, compared to just 40% of entry-level employees.
To learn more, view the full report here.

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